Difference Between Being Drunk and Being High

Discover the differences between being drunk and being high. Explore the effects, risks, and implications of alcohol and marijuana intoxication.

February 22, 2024

Understanding the Effects of Alcohol and Marijuana

When it comes to intoxication, it's important to understand the effects of different substances. Two commonly used substances are alcohol and marijuana, each having distinct effects on the body and mind.

Alcohol: A Depressant Substance

Alcohol is a depressant that affects the central nervous system. It slows down the functions of the brain and alters the way it communicates with the rest of the body. The effects of alcohol can vary depending on factors such as the amount consumed, the individual's tolerance, and other factors.

Common effects of alcohol intoxication include:

  • Impaired judgment and decision-making
  • Slowed reaction time and reflexes
  • Loss of coordination and balance
  • Reduced inhibitions and increased risk-taking behavior
  • Impaired memory and concentration

Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to a range of negative outcomes, including increased risk of accidents, violence, and long-term health problems. Alcohol is involved in about 16,000 homicides and over 30% of suicides each year, making it a significant contributor to these tragic events. Additionally, alcohol is a contributing factor in at least 40% of all violent crimes today.

Marijuana: A Mind-Altering Substance

Marijuana, also known as cannabis, is a mind-altering substance that affects the central nervous system. It primarily acts on cannabinoid receptors in the brain, which are involved in various physiological processes and cognitive functions. The effects of marijuana can vary depending on the strain, potency, method of consumption, and individual factors.

Common effects of marijuana intoxication include:

  • Euphoria and relaxation
  • Altered perception of time and space
  • Increased sensory perception
  • Impaired memory and concentration
  • Altered coordination and motor skills

Marijuana use can have both short-term and long-term effects on health and cognition. Short-term effects may include impaired memory and coordination, while long-term use can potentially lead to respiratory issues and cognitive impairments.

It's important to note that the effects of alcohol and marijuana can vary greatly between individuals. Factors such as the amount consumed, frequency of use, and individual tolerance can influence the intensity and duration of the effects. Additionally, the combination of alcohol and marijuana, known as crossfading, can result in increased intoxication and potential health risks.

Understanding the effects of alcohol and marijuana is crucial in making informed decisions and promoting responsible substance use. It's essential to prioritize personal safety, follow legal guidelines, and be aware of the potential risks associated with the consumption of these substances.

Differences in Behavior and Cognitive Effects

When comparing the effects of being drunk and being high, there are distinct differences in behavior and cognitive functioning.

Behavior and Psychological Effects of Being Drunk

Alcohol, being a depressant substance, affects the central nervous system and can have significant behavioral and psychological effects. When a person is drunk, they might become more talkative, have slower reaction times, and experience difficulty walking. In some cases, alcohol consumption can lead to increased aggression and irritability.

Other common behavioral effects of being drunk include:

  • Impaired judgment and decision-making abilities
  • Reduced inhibitions, leading to risk-taking behavior
  • Increased emotional volatility and mood swings
  • Slurred speech and impaired coordination

The psychological effects of alcohol intoxication can vary from person to person, but may include:

  • Altered perception of reality
  • Memory impairment
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Decreased attention span

Behavior and Psychological Effects of Being High

In contrast to alcohol, marijuana is a mind-altering substance that can produce different behavioral and psychological effects. When a person is high on marijuana, they may exhibit a more quiet and withdrawn behavior. The effects of being high can vary depending on the strain, method of consumption, and individual tolerance.

Some common behavioral effects of being high include:

  • Euphoria and a sense of relaxation
  • Altered perception of time and space
  • Increased sociability or introversion depending on the individual
  • Enhanced sensory perception

The psychological effects of marijuana use may include:

  • Altered thinking and creativity
  • Reduced stress and anxiety
  • Increased introspection
  • Heightened sense of well-being

It's important to note that individual experiences with both being drunk and being high can vary greatly. Factors such as dosage, tolerance, and individual differences contribute to the specific effects felt by each person.

Understanding the differences in behavior and cognitive effects between being drunk and being high is important for individuals to make informed choices and understand the potential consequences of substance use.

Physical Effects and Side Effects

Understanding the physical effects and side effects of being drunk and being high is important in differentiating between these two states of intoxication.

Physical Effects of Being Drunk

Alcohol, classified as a depressant, slows down the functions of the central nervous system. When individuals are drunk, they can experience a variety of physical effects. These may include:

  • Slurred speech
  • Slowed reflexes
  • Blurred vision
  • Impaired balance and coordination
  • Impaired motor function
  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Increased heart rate
  • Dry mouth

The severity of these effects can vary depending on factors such as the amount of alcohol consumed, the frequency and duration of consumption, and individual tolerance levels.

Physical Effects of Being High

Being high on marijuana, a mind-altering substance, can lead to a range of physical effects. While the physical effects of being high may not be as pronounced as those of being drunk, they can still be noticeable. Physical effects of being high can include:

  • Altered perception of time and space
  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Increased heart rate
  • Dry mouth
  • Slower reaction times

It's important to note that the physical effects of being high on marijuana may vary from person to person and can be influenced by factors such as the strain of marijuana consumed, the method of consumption, and individual tolerance levels.

Understanding the physical effects of being drunk and being high can help individuals differentiate between these two states of intoxication. While being drunk is associated with impaired motor function, memory, judgment, and coordination, being high is characterized by effects like relaxation, altered perception, and increased appetite, without impairing motor function or causing memory issues. It's important to consume alcohol and marijuana responsibly, considering the potential physical effects and the impact they can have on overall well-being.

Social and Legal Implications

When considering the differences between being drunk and being high, it is important to explore the social and legal implications associated with each state of intoxication.

Social Implications of Being Drunk

Being drunk, or under the influence of alcohol, can have significant social implications. Alcohol consumption has been linked to a variety of negative outcomes, including violent behavior and increased risk of accidents. According to the CDC, alcohol is involved in about 16,000 homicides and over 30% of suicides each year. Additionally, alcohol is a contributing factor in at least 40% of all violent crimes today. It is estimated that approximately 75% of sexual assaults are perpetrated by individuals who are intoxicated at the time of the assault.

Excessive alcohol consumption can impair judgment and decision-making abilities, leading to risky behaviors and strained relationships. It can also contribute to conflicts and alter one's personality, affecting social interactions and overall well-being. Alcohol intoxication has been implicated in various fatal incidents such as burn injuries, drownings, homicides, severe trauma injuries, sexual assaults, motor vehicle crashes, suicides, and fatal falls.

Legal Implications of Being High

Being high, or under the influence of marijuana, also carries legal implications, as marijuana use remains illegal in many jurisdictions. The legal status of marijuana varies from country to country and even within different states or regions. It is important to familiarize oneself with local laws and regulations regarding marijuana use to avoid any legal consequences.

Driving under the influence of marijuana is illegal in most places, as it impairs motor skills, reaction time, and judgment, increasing the risk of accidents. Possession, sale, or distribution of marijuana may also lead to legal repercussions, depending on the specific laws in your jurisdiction.

It is crucial to note that while some regions have legalized marijuana for medicinal or recreational purposes, there are still limitations and regulations in place. It is essential to adhere to these laws to avoid legal issues and potential criminal charges.

Understanding the social and legal implications of both being drunk and being high is important for individuals to make informed decisions and engage responsibly. It is advisable to prioritize personal safety, adhere to legal guidelines, and consider the potential impact on relationships and overall well-being when consuming alcohol or marijuana.

Health Risks and Effects on Cognition

When comparing the effects of alcohol use and marijuana use, it's important to consider the health risks associated with each substance, as well as their impact on cognition and memory.

Health Risks of Alcohol Use

Alcohol is a depressant that slows down the functions of the central nervous system. The effects of alcohol on a person can vary depending on factors such as the amount consumed, frequency of use, and duration of use.

Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to a range of health risks, including:

  • Liver disease
  • Cardiovascular problems
  • Increased risk of certain types of cancer
  • Pancreatitis
  • Weakened immune system
  • Mental health disorders

Alcohol is also involved in a significant number of violent crimes, suicides, and homicides each year. It is a contributing factor in approximately 40% of all violent crimes today.

Health Risks of Marijuana Use

Marijuana, also known as cannabis, has its own set of health risks. While some states have legalized its recreational or medicinal use, it's important to be aware of the potential consequences.

Long-term marijuana use has been associated with mental health issues such as psychosis, depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. However, it's worth noting that study findings on these connections have been mixed. Additionally, the amount of THC (the psychoactive component of marijuana) has been steadily increasing in recent years, which may lead to a higher risk of harmful reactions, addiction, and an increase in emergency room visits related to marijuana use.

It's important to approach marijuana use with caution and be aware of potential risks, especially for individuals with underlying mental health conditions.

Effects on Cognition and Memory

Both alcohol and marijuana can have significant effects on cognition and memory.

Chronic drug abuse, including alcohol and marijuana, has been associated with cognitive deficits. These deficits can include impairments in working memory, attention, associative learning, serial addition and subtraction, time estimation, verbal fluency, pattern recognition, planning, and decision-making. Importantly, these cognitive deficits may persist even after a person stops using drugs.

The impact of alcohol and marijuana on cognition and memory highlights the potential long-term consequences of substance abuse. It is essential to consider the risks and effects on cognitive function when making decisions about alcohol and marijuana use.

Understanding the health risks and cognitive effects of alcohol and marijuana is crucial for making informed choices and promoting overall well-being. It is important to prioritize mental and physical health when considering the use of these substances.

Addiction and Withdrawal

When it comes to substance abuse, addiction and withdrawal are important factors to consider. Both alcohol and marijuana have the potential for addiction, and individuals may experience withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop or reduce their use.

Addiction Potential of Alcohol

Alcohol is a highly addictive substance that can lead to physical and psychological dependence. According to the NCBI, addiction to alcohol is a disorder of altered cognition, with brain regions and processes involved in addiction overlapping with those involved in essential cognitive functions such as learning, memory, attention, reasoning, and impulse control.

The addictive nature of alcohol can be attributed to its effects on the brain's reward system. Regular and excessive alcohol consumption can lead to changes in brain chemistry, reinforcing the desire to continue drinking. Over time, individuals may develop a tolerance, requiring larger amounts of alcohol to achieve the desired effects.

Addiction Potential of Marijuana

Marijuana, also known as cannabis, can also be addictive, although the risk of addiction is generally lower compared to alcohol. The NCBI states that chronic drug abuse, including marijuana use, can lead to cognitive deficits, impairing various cognitive functions such as working memory, attention, learning, decision-making, and more.

While addiction to marijuana is possible, the prevalence of addiction is generally lower compared to alcohol. However, it's important to note that individual susceptibility to addiction may vary, and some individuals may be more prone to developing an addiction to marijuana.

Withdrawal Symptoms

When individuals who are addicted to alcohol or marijuana attempt to stop or reduce their use, they may experience withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms can vary in severity and duration, depending on the individual and the extent of their addiction.

Withdrawal symptoms associated with alcohol dependence may include:

  • Anxiety
  • Tremors
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Irritability
  • Depression

On the other hand, marijuana withdrawal symptoms may include:

  • Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • Loss of appetite
  • Anxiety
  • Mood swings

It's important to note that withdrawal symptoms can be challenging to manage without proper support and guidance. Seeking professional help from healthcare providers or addiction specialists can be beneficial for individuals who are experiencing withdrawal symptoms and aiming to overcome their addiction.

Understanding the addictive potential of alcohol and marijuana, as well as the potential withdrawal symptoms, can help individuals make informed decisions about their substance use and seek appropriate support if needed. Addiction is a complex issue, and addressing it requires a comprehensive approach that considers both physical and psychological factors.

Crossfading: Combining Alcohol and Marijuana

When alcohol and marijuana are consumed simultaneously or in close proximity, it is referred to as crossfading. Crossfading can lead to increased intoxication and produce more intense and unpredictable effects compared to consuming either substance individually. This interaction impairs judgment, coordination, and decision-making.

Risks and Effects of Crossfading

Combining alcohol and marijuana through crossfading can have various risks and effects on the body and mind. Some potential risks and effects include:

  • Increased Intoxication: Crossfading can intensify the effects of both alcohol and marijuana, leading to heightened levels of intoxication. The combination of these substances can result in enhanced impairment, making it more challenging to perform tasks that require focus and coordination.
  • Impaired Cognitive Function: The simultaneous use of alcohol and marijuana can significantly impair cognitive function. This can manifest as difficulties with memory, concentration, and problem-solving. Decision-making abilities may also be compromised, increasing the risk of engaging in risky behavior.
  • Intensified Psychological Effects: Crossfading can amplify the psychological effects of both alcohol and marijuana. This can result in heightened mood changes, altered perception, and increased feelings of euphoria or anxiety. The specific psychological effects experienced may vary from person to person.

Health Concerns and Increased Intoxication

Crossfading poses potential health concerns and can lead to increased levels of intoxication. Some specific health concerns associated with crossfading include:

  • Increased Risk of Cancer: Research suggests that combining alcohol and cannabis through crossfading may pose an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer, such as liver and esophageal cancer. The simultaneous exposure to both substances may have a synergistic effect, potentially exacerbating the harmful impact on the body.

It is important to note that crossfading affects individuals differently, and the risks and effects can vary based on factors such as the amount and potency of alcohol and marijuana consumed, as well as individual tolerance levels. It is advisable to exercise caution and make informed decisions when considering crossfading to minimize potential harms.

Understanding the risks and effects of crossfading can help individuals make informed choices about their substance use. If you have concerns about substance use or need support, it is recommended to seek guidance from healthcare professionals or addiction specialists who can provide personalized assistance.

Cognitive Impairments in Substance Abuse

Substance abuse, whether it involves alcohol or marijuana, can have significant effects on cognitive function. Cognitive impairments refer to difficulties in mental processes such as memory, attention, and decision-making. In the context of substance abuse, these impairments can have a profound impact on an individual's daily functioning and overall quality of life.

Prevalence of Cognitive Impairments

Studies have shown that cognitive impairments are prevalent among individuals with substance use disorders. The prevalence of cognitive impairments in this population is estimated to be between 30% and 80%. However, it's important to note that the specific cognitive deficits can vary depending on the substance being used.

For example, research has found that patients using alcohol tend to have lower total and memory domain scores compared to those using cannabis. On the other hand, patients using opioids may have lower scores on visuospatial abilities compared to cannabis or stimulant users. Additionally, younger patients tend to score higher on cognitive assessments compared to older patients.

These findings highlight the diverse impact that different substances can have on cognitive function. It's important for individuals struggling with substance abuse to be aware of these potential cognitive impairments and seek appropriate support and treatment.

Impact on Treatment Outcome

Cognitive impairments in chronic substance abuse can significantly affect treatment outcomes. Research suggests that individuals with cognitive impairments are more likely to experience difficulties in treatment, including higher dropout rates. This highlights the importance of addressing cognitive functioning as part of the treatment process.

Treatment approaches that specifically target cognitive impairments, such as cognitive remediation therapy, have shown promise in improving cognitive function and overall treatment outcomes. These interventions aim to enhance cognitive skills and compensate for any deficits, enabling individuals to better engage in their recovery process.

Furthermore, cognitive impairments can impact an individual's ability to make informed decisions, resist cravings, and cope with triggers. Addressing these cognitive deficits as part of substance abuse treatment can help individuals develop adaptive strategies and skills to manage these challenges effectively.

In conclusion, cognitive impairments are prevalent among individuals with substance use disorders and can have a significant impact on treatment outcomes. Recognizing the specific cognitive deficits associated with different substances and implementing targeted interventions can help individuals with substance abuse disorders improve their cognitive functioning and enhance their overall recovery journey.

Differences Between Being Drunk and Being High

Understanding the distinctions between being drunk and being high is essential for comprehending the effects of alcohol and marijuana on the body and mind. While both alcohol and marijuana can induce altered states of consciousness, they differ in terms of their behavioral, cognitive, and physical effects.

Behavior and Psychological Effects

When a person is under the influence of alcohol, they may exhibit more talkative behavior and have slower reaction times. Alcohol can lower inhibitions, leading to increased sociability in some individuals. On the other hand, being high on marijuana can result in a more quiet and withdrawn demeanor. Marijuana use can lead to relaxation and calmness in some individuals.

Physical Effects

Alcohol is a depressant that slows down the functions of the central nervous system. It can impact coordination and motor skills, often resulting in impaired balance and difficulty with reflexes. In contrast, the physical effects of marijuana may be less pronounced in terms of coordination, but it can alter perceptions of time and space.

Side Effects

Intoxication from alcohol can lead to hangovers, characterized by symptoms such as headache, nausea, and fatigue. Conversely, marijuana users may experience a "weed hangover," which is often marked by grogginess and fatigue.

Cognitive Effects

Both alcohol and marijuana can impact cognitive function. Alcohol consumption can lead to impaired judgment, memory loss, and difficulty concentrating. Marijuana use may result in short-term memory impairment and difficulties with attention and learning. However, the specific cognitive effects can vary based on individual differences and the amount consumed.

Understanding the differences between being drunk and being high is crucial for informed decision-making and risk assessment. It's important to note that the effects of alcohol and marijuana can vary depending on factors such as dosage, frequency of use, and individual sensitivity. If you have concerns about substance abuse or addiction, it is recommended to seek professional help and guidance.

References

Related posts

Trump's Drug Policy
Trump's Drug Policy
Read More
Effects of Alcohol on Blood Pressure
Effects of Alcohol on Blood Pressure
Read More
Alcohol Awareness Month Activities
Alcohol Awareness Month Activities
Read More
How to Decide Whether You Need Inpatient vs. Outpatient Addiction Treatment
How to Decide Whether You Need Inpatient vs. Outpatient Addiction Treatment
Read More
Residential Treatment Centers Not Always Possible for Recovery
Residential Treatment Centers Not Always Possible for Recovery
Read More
Health Benefits of Drinking Wine
Health Benefits of Drinking Wine
Read More
Four Main Triggers for Relapse in Recovery
Four Main Triggers for Relapse in Recovery
Read More
Ways to Be Supportive of Recovery
Ways to Be Supportive of Recovery
Read More
Five Herbs to Aid in the Recovery Process
Five Herbs to Aid in the Recovery Process
Read More
Circle

Start Your Journey with Us

We're always here for you - reach out to us today.